Thoughtless spending, continuation of Chinese Coronavirus panic constitute lowlights of Tuesday’s Commissioners Court agenda

Thoughtless spending, continuation of Chinese Coronavirus panic constitute lowlights of Tuesday’s Commissioners Court agenda

Image: Strangely enough, Precinct 2 County Commissioner Charlie Riley (left) and Precinct 1 County Commissioner Mike Meador (right) seem to lead efforts to constrain County government spending, while the ostensible “conservatives” on the Commissioners Court are leading the charge to flatten the Montgomery County economy.

The Golden Hammer Staff Reports

Conroe, May 12 – The irony of recent behavior of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court truly overwhelms the senses. The Tuesday, May 12, 2020, Commissioners Court meeting appears a symphony of Chinese Coronavirus panic and heartless government spending (and taxation), while Precinct 2 County Commissioner Charlie Riley and Precinct 1 County Commissioner Mike Meador seem to lead the charge towards common sense.

At the April 28, 2020, meeting of the Commissioners Court, Meador and Riley drew the line on government spending while others seemed to follow or ignore them. Precinct 1 Commissioner Mike Meador sounded the most compassionate of all towards Montgomery County taxpayers. “My opinion is don’t come to us and ask for anything…It’s going to be a real different budget session this year,” Meador said. “It’s going to be a 2008 budget session this year.”

Meador further expressed, “We’ve got a lot of people who are in a real bind…It’s time to tighten the belt.”

Precinct 2 County Commissioner Charlie Riley said, “We’re going to end up with a budget that we got right now…I don’t think we should worry with the mid-year budget…It should be a real simple budget year.”

Unfortunately, Precinct 3 County Commissioner James Noack is doing just that at the May 12, 2020, Commissioners Court meeting. Noack invited mid-year budget increases by placing the following agenda item on the May 12 agenda: “Consider, discuss and take appropriate action on any elected offical or department heads mid-year budget request.” Noack explained that he’s trying to be fair to some department heads who haven’t had the opportunity to ask for increases in their budgets. Nevertheless, Riley and Meador have correctly noted that the taxpayers are in a real bind.

Riley’s and Meador’s compassion is most appropriate in the instance of this government-mandated depression, which resulted from the business shutdowns and citizen lockdowns emanating from Montgomery County Judge Mark Keough’s office during his panicked reaction to the Chinese coronavirus projections emanating from power-hungry federal agencies looking to expand their jurisdictions.

Keough continues to enjoy his “emergency powers” of questionable constitutionality with his own agenda item: “Discuss and take appropriate actions, including immediate action, due to the imminent threat to public health and safety as a result of the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), epidemic.” A fatality rate of 17 (sadly) out of 600,000 citizens constitutes a 0.0003% fatality rate. The real “imminent threat to public health and safety” is Keough’s and Governor Greg Abbott’s suspension of the Texas Constitution and the United States Constitution without any Constitutional or statutory authority. Hopefully, the Commissioners Court will draw the line and end further “immediate actions.”

Meanwhile, the County government’s spending has not slowed at all. County taxpayers continue to pay salaries for empty departmental operations, such as the Convention Center, which obviously do nothing when the County government has flattened economic activity. Instead of reviewing mid-year budget requests, one might thing that a County government having any compassion whatsoever for the citizens of this community would look at emergency methods of implementing drastic reductions in spending in order to alleviate the enormous tax burden on County taxpayers.
None of the members of the Commissioners Court have acted to reduce Fiscal Year 2020 spending. Clearly, the Commissioners Court should take mid-year budget action to reduce the Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

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