Montgomery County Commissioners Court salaries questioned, while economic shutdown orders in place

Montgomery County Judge Mark Keough.

The Golden Hammer Staff Reports

Conroe, April 7 – The bloated salaries and benefits of the members of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court raise major questions, especially during the economic shutdown, which they have spurred. It’s helpful to examine how much they’re costing taxpayers in their salaries and benefits alone and to compare how many individuals, particularly restaurant workers who have lost their jobs due to Commissioners Court decisions, would benefit if those funds went elsewhere.

It’s also important to note that, in Montgomery County, more individuals have lost their lives from economic downturn-related suicides than from the Chinese coronavirus. Meanwhile, many businesses and employees have begun to push back on government’s argument that American individuals aren’t responsible enough to engage in the social distancing and preferred hygienic practices necessary to “flatten the curve” or stop increases in the spread of the Chinese viral flu.

Perhaps, most importantly, the idea of the politicians on the Commissioners Court not drawing a salary, while the taxpayers’ earnings have come to a halt, just seems fair. If they, out of fundamental fairness, abated their own incomes, they might more readily turn on the economic spigot and release us from government mandates for which they only have questionable authority and which clearly violate provisions of the United States and Texas Constitutions.

What Commissioners Court salaries are costing the taxpayers

There are five members of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court, a County Judge and four County Commissioners. Their duty is to oversee the County government, although they do not manage law enforcement functions under other elected officials, such as the Sheriff, the elected Constables, or the judiciary.

Mark Keough is the Montgomery County Judge.

Salary = $154,774.36.

Benefits = $62,374.07.

Cell phone = $959.92.

Keough Total Cost to Taxpayers = $218,108.35.

Mike Meador is the Precinct 1 County Commissioner.

Salary = $177,174.92.

Benefits = $71,401.49.

Meador Total Cost to Taxpayers = $248,576.41.

Charlie Riley is the Precinct 2 County Commissioner.

Salary = $177,174.92.

Benefits = $71,401.49.

Riley gave his wife a job on the payroll with salary of $60,875.00 and benefits of $24,532.63.

Riley Total Cost to Taxpayers = $333,984.04.

James Noack is the Precinct 3 County Commissioner.

Salary = $178,134.84.

Benefits = $71,788.34.

Cell phone = $959.92.

Noack Total Cost to Taxpayers = $250,882.38.

James Metts is the Precinct 4 County Commissioner.

Salary = $177,174.92.

Benefits = $71,401.49.

Metts gave his live-in girlfriend a job on the payroll with salary of $115,000.00, benefits of $46,345, and cell phone $959.92.

Metts Total Cost to Taxpayers = $410,884.33.

Adding the cost of the five members of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court yields the following sum:

Montgomery County Commissioners Court Cost to Taxpayers = $1,462,435.41.

Cost to Restaurant Workers

The edicts of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court have resulted in massive unemployment, particularly among food workers.

According to Salary.com, the median earnings for a fast food worker in the Greater Houston Area is $22,688 per year, including all wages and benefits.

The median earnings for a fast food worker in the Greater Houston Area is $22,688. Source: Salary.com.

Conclusion

By dividing the median earnings into the total cost to the taxpayers of the Montgomery County Commissioners Court, which comprises five (5) very highly-paid individuals, one finds they receive the earnings equivalent of $1,462,435.41/$22,688 = 64 (sixty-four) individuals.

In other words, if the Commissioners Court members were to place themselves on par with their constituents, by suspending their compensation during the period of the Chinese coronavirus shutdown or lockdown, and if they took that compensation and provided it to fast food workers who have lost their jobs as a result of the Commissioners Court orders, they could save the jobs of approximately sixty-four (64) hard working people.

In other words, if the Commissioners Court members were to place themselves on par with their constituents, by suspending their compensation during the period of the Chinese coronavirus shutdown or lockdown, and if they took that compensation and provided it to fast food workers who have lost their jobs as a result of the Commissioners Court orders, they could save the jobs of approximately sixty-four (64) hard working people.

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