Fierce citizen-advocate George Hyde successfully pushes overwhelming censure of Brady, other Texas GOP Congressman who voted for Omnibus Spending Bill

Fierce citizen-advocate George Hyde successfully pushes overwhelming censure of Brady, other Texas GOP Congressman who voted for Omnibus Spending Bill

Image: Citizen-advocate George Hyde from Benders Landing in south Montgomery County was the delegate who successfully pushed through a resolution censuring United States Congressman Kevin Brady (R-The Woodlands), United States Senator John Cornyn (R-Texas), and all of the Texas Congressional delegation members who voted for H.R. 1625, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018. After some parliamentary maneuvers by Hyde and his allies, Jon Bouche, Sean Ricker, and Brian Crumby, Hyde’s censure resolution passed by an enormous margin on a voice vote at the Senatorial District 4 Convention in Montgomery on Saturday, March 24, 2018.

Montgomery, March 25 – George Hyde, a soft-spoken private citizen who was a Republican Senatorial Convention Delegate yesterday in the Senatorial District 4 Convention at the Lone Star Community Center in Montgomery, successfully pushed through an overwhelming censure of United States Congressman Kevin Brady and all of the other Texas Republican members of Congress who voted for the bloated, hastily-carved, omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018. Hyde’s resolution stated, “Senatorial District 4 holds the Republican members of the Texas delegation to Congress in contempt for their affirmative votes on any omnibus spending bills including the one passed on March 22, 2018.”

The Hyde’s Resolution: “Senatorial District 4 holds the Republican members of the Texas delegation to Congress in contempt for their affirmative votes on any omnibus spending bills including the one passed on March 22, 2018.”

Hyde’s Resolution required some parliamentary maneuvers to get to the point where the entire Senatorial Convention of approximately 350 delegates was able to vote up or down on the proposal. Hyde enlisted the help of some allies, Jon Bouche, the extremely popular Precinct Chairman of Oak Ridge North, Brian Crumby, the longstanding Precinct Chairman from Magnolia, delegate Sean Ricker at first sought to bring the floor for debate by suspending the Convention Rules. Convention Chairman Dale Inman would not permit that procedure to move the Hyde Resolution forward. Instead, Crumby suggested the brilliant idea of utilizing Rule 12 of the Rules of the Republican Party of Texas, an arcane rule that permits consideration of matters by an entire Convention.

After the Rule 12 motion sailed through the Convention, it was only a matter of minutes before the Hyde Resolution passed with close to 90% of the Delegates voting “aye” on a voice vote. The censure includes the following Republican members of Congress from Texas who voted for the $1.3 trillion spending bill to keep the federal government open:

  • United States Senator John Cornyn (R-Texas);
  • United States Congressman Kevin Brady (R-The Woodlands), Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee;
  • United States Congressman Sam Johnson (R-Dallas);
  • United States Congressman Jeb Hensarling (R-Stephenville);
  • United States Congressman John Culberson (R-Houston);
  • United States Congressman Michael McCaul (R-West Lake Hills);
  • United States Congressman Michael Conaway (R-Midland);
  • United States Congresswoman Kay Granger (R-Fort Worth);
  • United States Congressman Mac Thornberry (R-Clarendon);
  • United States Congressman Bill Flores (R-Bryan);
  • United States Congressman Jodey Arrington (R-Lubbock);
  • United States Congressman Lamar Smith (R-San Antonio);
  • United States Congressman Pete Olson (R-Houston);
  • United States Congressman Will Hurd (R-San Antonio);
  • United States Congressman Kenny Marchant (R-Carrollton);
  • United States Congressman Michael Burgess (R-Dallas);
  • United States Congressman John Carter (R-Round Rock); and
  • United States Congressman Pete Sessions (R-Waco).

Hyde was very critical of all of the “omnibus” spending bills that Congress has passed in recent years. Instead of following normal budget and appropriate procedures, omnibus spending bills are usually emergency or stopgap measures that keep the federal government afloat for a specific period of time. Since Congress has become so dysfunctional, they’ve resorted to passing omnibus spending bills regularly where members of the House of Representatives and Senate can hide massive spending proposals.

The 2018 omnibus bill was no exception with respect to the crazed spending programs contained in it. United States Senator Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) has published a partial list of some of the spending programs contained within the $1.3 trillion spending behemoth. Paul’s list follows:

United States Senator Rand Paul’s partial list of spending contained within the 2018 omnibus spending act.

Hyde’s outstanding floor work to pass the Hyde Resolution is an example of the enormous impact a single delegate can have within the highly open and transparent Republican Party of Texas. Hyde was not an officer of any sort at the Convention. By guile, courage, and persistence, he convinced a room full of 350 political activists to support his Resolution.

The Senatorial District 3 Convention which includes voting precincts in northern areas of Montgomery County passed a similar censure resolution earlier in the day.

The omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act keep the government open through the end of September, 2018. It includes increases in infrastructure spending and part of the border wall proposal which is a centerpiece of President Donald Trump’s agenda. The legislation fails to address the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

United States Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) has explained that he voted against the bill, because (1) it failed to include an overhaul of Congress’ sexual harassment policies, (2) it provided increased funding for many regulatory programs, and (3) the bill provided insufficient border funding.

Senatorial District 4 Convention

In other action, the Senatorial District 4 Convention elected 221 Delegates and 221 Alternates to the Republican State Convention in June and passed a group of resolutions including one calling for substantial reductions in government spending at the local, state, and federal levels of government.

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