A week of tribute to activism, Part 1 of 7: “You have no enemies, you say?”

A week of tribute to activism, Part 1 of 7: “You have no enemies, you say?”

Image: What a great assemblage of impactful political activists! Left to right: Ginger Russell, the “Quiet Lady From Magnolia” and renowned education expert; Kelli Ann Cox, Publisher of The Golden Hammer, who killed “red light cameras” in Texas and was instrumental in ensuring all Montgomery County taxpayers enjoy a 20% homestead exemption from County government taxes; Jennie Stephenson, a brilliant organizer who led the right-to-work movement in the United States and had enormous impacts in her communities in Washington state as well as Texas; Suzanne Rogers, one of the great hearts and minds of the Montgomery County Tea Party and one of the greatest phone bank volunteers of all time; and Cindy Muth Gaskill, who led the successful fight to defend the Alamo against the depredations of Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush and musician Phil Collins, and now serves as Treasurer of the Texas Patriots PAC.

The Golden Hammer Staff Reports

Conroe, Austin, and San Antonio, June 20 – Political activists truly are remarkable people. They do what they do without pay. They do what they do entirely for the betterment of their community rather than for any personal gain.

The political elite against whom activists almost always work constantly harass activists and do everything they can to try to shut them up. A great example of those efforts by the arrogant power mongers was the work of former Conroe Independent School District Board President Datren Williams, who accused the conservative activists who fought for children’s rights within the school district of acting out of “selfish interest.” The irony in Williams’ accusations came from the reality that it was the activists, who worked against him, who acted out of community interest and for no personal interest, while Williams and his political cronies sought to tax beleaguered taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars to deliver those funds into the hands of their favored recipients.

This week of tribute to political activism, therefore, begins with the great poem by Charles MacKay, a Scottish poet, journalist, and author, who died in 1849. His poem talks specifically of the work of political activists and the injuries they must suffer.

If you’ve had any success as a political activist, you know the feeling of walking into a room where every single person glares at you and you know precisely what it’s like to have political foes. All five of those ladies shown in the photography at the top of this article have experienced that feeling many times throughout their great work for their communities: Ginger Russell, the “Quiet Lady From Magnolia” and renowned education expert; Kelli Ann Cox, Publisher of The Golden Hammer, who killed “red light cameras” in Texas and was instrumental in ensuring all Montgomery County taxpayers enjoy a 20% homestead exemption from County government taxes; Jennie Stephenson, a brilliant organizer who led the right-to-work movement in the United States and had enormous impacts in her communities in Washington state as well as Texas; Suzanne Rogers, one of the great hearts and minds of the Montgomery County Tea Party and one of the greatest phone bank volunteers of all time; and Cindy Muth Gaskill, who led the successful fight to defend the Alamo against the depredations of Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush and musician Phil Collins, and now serves as Treasurer of the Texas Patriots PAC. All five of them led the campaign to defeat Conroe ISD’s $800 million bond referendum in 2019.

“You Have No Enemies” by Charles MacKay

You have no enemies, you say?

    Alas! my friend, the boast is poor;

He who has mingled in the fray

    Of duty, that the brave endure,

Must have made foes! If you have none,

Small is the work that you have done.

You’ve hit no traitor on the hip,

You’ve dashed no cup from perjured lip,

You’ve never turned the wrong to right,

You’ve been a coward in the fight.

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